Be ready to answer these currency questions from your customers

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By Stephen Kuhl, CFA

As we’re seeing with the COVID-19 crisis, very little in our economy is purely local.

Currency markets are one example. The markets are reflections of what is happening globally. They serve as the ultimate sentiment indicator, telling us what the future may bring for a country, region, or the world at large.

But the sentiment can be costly – changes in currency rates can alter business costs in the blink of an eye. Still, many have no understanding of how currencies work, an opportunity ripe for your community bank to offer some education.

While most would assume that the stock market is the biggest asset class on the trade block, it pales in comparison to currency trading volumes. Bloomberg reports that $6.6 trillion USD traded daily in 2019.

Your business clients may buy a product from a local manufacturer, but where does that manufacturer buy its machinery? Where do they buy supplies to create their goods? Even local businesses tend to have international partners somewhere in their supply chains. Because of this, prices of the local goods are affected by currency rates.

Further, the world of currencies is surprisingly abstract. The U.S. dollar doesn’t have a single price. It has a unique price relative to the 200 or so other currencies in the world.

All of those prices fluctuate moment to moment because currency rates aren’t anchored by specific metrics. Instead, they reflect how buyers feel about the economic outlook of one country compared to another at any given time.

This is why your business clients can no longer be complacent. Outside the pandemic, previously stable countries have become unsettled by climate change. Once developing economies are maturing. It’s no longer the case that any particular currency is the safest bet. More and more, the name of the game is currency diversification.

But the good news is, your community bank can help business clients protect themselves from currency fluctuations. The first step is to help them figure out how they’re at risk.

Find out how.

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